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Story 139 – 1935 – Innovation Quality Business model

The beginning of a long partnership

Wieland exhibits at the motor show for the first time in 1935

The complex profiles that Wieland had been producing using the extrusion process since the early 1930s were also of interest to the automotive industry. Consequently, Wieland was represented at the forerunner of the IAA for the first time in 1935 - and established an intensive cooperation which continues to this day.

The history of the International Motor Show (IAA) dates back to 1897, when the Central European Motor Car Association (MMV) first exhibited six "motor cars" at its founding meeting in Berlin. Just two years later, the exhibition counted over 100 exhibitors – in 1905, even Kaiser Wilhelm II honoured the event by officially opening it.

Even during the Nazi era, the trade fair, then known as the "International Automobile and Motorcycle Exhibition" (IAMA) and based in Berlin, enjoyed the support of the highest authorities. Adolf Hitler used the enthusiasm for the automobile to present his regime as modern and to show the people his vision of individual mobility for everyone. In 1934, he heralded a classless vehicle at the IAMA. One year later, in his opening speech, he announced that the preliminary design phase of the KdF (Kraft durch Freude) car had been completed. The vehicle – the VW Beetle – would write automotive history after the Second World War.

In 1935, the comparatively small exhibition stand of Wieland-Werke Ulm probably received less attention from the "masses". Only one photograph has survived which shows a selection of extruded light metal profiles. They were in demand in the automotive industry, not only as frame and cover profiles but also, and above all, in radiator production, which is why some fully assembled radiators were also on display at the exhibition.

Whether these were manufactured by Wieland - as a component supplier – or from Wieland profiles by the automotive companies themselves cannot be said today. What is certain, however, is that the beginnings of a completely new business field were rooted in that modest exhibition stand from 1935. Since then, Wieland has developed into an innovative and reliable partner for numerous customers in the automotive sector - with highly developed semi-finished products and complete assemblies whose complexity extends far beyond the coolers presented at that time.

The undated photograph shows that after radiator elements, bumper profiles were soon part of Wieland's automotive product portfolio.